Tag Archives | Museum

A Zero Tide

Friday the 13th was special for more than its usual notoriety. Just after noon, we had a zero tide. This is a relatively rare event, often not happening for a number of years. The “zero tide” refers to the tide height. Typically for this area “a low tide” is measured in the range of 2 […]

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The Schools of Squirrel Cove – by Lynne Jordan

At the beginning of the 1900s, Squirrel Cove on the east side of Cortes Island was a hub of activity for homesteaders, loggers, fishermen, miners and trappers. They came from all the surrounding islands for supplies, groceries, mail, repairs, radios and dances in the hall. There were two stores, a post office, church, hall, two […]

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HUGE THANKS to George Sirk

HUGE THANKS to George Sirk for so ably entertaining those attending the Cortes Museum’s AGM on March 18th.  George, with some help from wife Kim, regaled guests with hilarious tales of travels, animals, birds, volcanoes, flowers and jungles in Costa Rica.  In his inimitable way, George transported everyone to this lush land with his amazing photos.  […]

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Hiking in West Greenland

Eighty-five Islanders were treated to a vicarious adventure at Manson’s hall on Sunday afternoon, 25 February 2018. Using her excellent photographs and maps of the area, Iris Steigemann described her experiences trekking in West Greenland and the reason why she returns so often to hike along the Arctic Circle Trail. Amy Robertson, Anna Ochsenbein and […]

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2017 Christmas Bird Count

On a very rainy Sunday, December 17, 2017, thirty-five bird enthusiasts attended the CBC – Christmas Bird Count Day, sponsored by the Cortes Island Museum, Audubon Society and Bird Studies Canada. In the heavy at times and continuous rain, with water covered eye glasses, binoculars and cameras, it was difficult to spot and recognize birds. […]

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The Man Called Nakatsui – by Mike Manson

Childhood memories are some of the best. As a young boy I spent my summers on Cortes. It was before the days of ferries and power. We stayed in our little shack on the beach and when the evening darkness came I would ask my father to tell me stories of the olden days. My […]

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Doris Hope – by Tara Warkentin

I never met Doris Hope. I was born in 1998, and she passed away in 2000. However, during the summer of 2017 as the museum summer student, I have gotten to know her. “Hope’s Refuge,” her transcript of life in the Cove, stories from her friends, the “Refugees,” bring Doris to life. Boats were central […]

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Dalias – Heritage Garden

Dalias – Living History — The Heritage Garden at the Cortes Island Museum The Heritage Garden in late summer and fall — a transition season. Here are some plants that will reliably provide bloom and colour in the garden at this time. Dahlia species were first introduced from Mexico to Europe in the 1800s. A […]

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Orcas in Von Donop Lagoon, ca. 1949 – by Lynne Jordan

Like a number of families in the 1940s, the Herrewigs were a logging family living on their camp floats in Von Donop Creek (now called Von Donop Inlet) on the northwest of Cortes Island. Violet Herrewig and Amy McKenzie remember in 1949 when five blackfish (that’s what everyone on the coast called killer whales/orcas in […]

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Peony – Heritage Garden

Peony – Living History – The Heritage Garden at the Cortes Island Museum Early summer in the garden – peonies, roses, lilies and lavender – a wonderful season for colour and fragrance. One of the first flowers to bloom in the early summer are peonies. The selections in the Heritage Garden were introduced in the […]

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Refuge Cove: Moving with the Tide

Our new exhibit Refuge Cove: Moving with the Tide celebrated its opening on June 24th, 2017, as Ken Hanuse of Klahoose First Nation drummed a welcoming song.  Ken also sang the Woman’s Warrior Song to honour Judith Williams, the exhibition curator.  Introduced by Bonnie MacDonald, Judith thanked many people including her class of Curatorial Trainees, […]

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Owls Are the Best Field Assistants in Biodiversity Studies – by Christian Gronau

Owls Are the Best Field Assistants in Biodiversity Studies – An Appreciation of Owl Pellets Oliver Pearson, a pioneer in Patagonian mammalogy, always said that owls were his best field assistants during Patagonian surveys. They hunted more species and more individuals than his trap lines, so they were useful estimators of field abundance.                […]

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