Archive | Blog

The Schools of Squirrel Cove – by Lynne Jordan

At the beginning of the 1900s, Squirrel Cove on the east side of Cortes Island was a hub of activity for homesteaders, loggers, fishermen, miners and trappers. They came from all the surrounding islands for supplies, groceries, mail, repairs, radios and dances in the hall. There were two stores, a post office, church, hall, two […]

Continue Reading 0
0

The Man Called Nakatsui – by Mike Manson

Childhood memories are some of the best. As a young boy I spent my summers on Cortes. It was before the days of ferries and power. We stayed in our little shack on the beach and when the evening darkness came I would ask my father to tell me stories of the olden days. My […]

Continue Reading 0
0

Doris Hope – by Tara Warkentin

I never met Doris Hope. I was born in 1998, and she passed away in 2000. However, during the summer of 2017 as the museum summer student, I have gotten to know her. “Hope’s Refuge,” her transcript of life in the Cove, stories from her friends, the “Refugees,” bring Doris to life. Boats were central […]

Continue Reading 0
0

Erratics – by Christian Gronau

A Brief Survey of Cortes Island Beach Rocks DEFINITION: erratic (er-rat’-ic) n. A rock fragment carried by glacial ice, or by floating ice, deposited at some distance from the outcrop from which it was derived, and generally though not necessarily resting on bedrock of different lithology. Size ranges from a pebble to a house-size block. Bates […]

Continue Reading 0
0

Heritage Garden – by Donna McLaren

Living History — The Heritage Garden at the Cortes Island Museum. The Heritage Garden in late summer and fall — a transition season. Here are some plants that will reliably provide bloom and colour in the garden at this time. Dahlia species were first introduced from Mexico to Europe in the 1800s. A different species […]

Continue Reading 1
1

Orcas in Von Donop Lagoon, ca. 1949 – by Lynne Jordan

Like a number of families in the 1940s, the Herrewigs were a logging family living on their camp floats in Von Donop Creek (now called Von Donop Inlet) on the northwest of Cortes Island. Violet Herrewig and Amy McKenzie remember in 1949 when five blackfish (that’s what everyone on the coast called killer whales/orcas in […]

Continue Reading 12
12

Heritage Garden – by Donna McLaren

Living History – The Heritage Garden at the Cortes Island Museum. Early summer in the garden – peonies, roses, lilies and lavender – a wonderful season for colour and fragrance. One of the first flowers to bloom in the early summer are peonies. The selections in the Heritage Garden were introduced in the 1880s and […]

Continue Reading 0
0

Nature Notes – by George Sirk

Hi to everyone who is interested in the arrivals of different species to our area. And not just birds! (but mostly!) But let’s start with our feathered dinosaurs… Spring migration is just ramping up. That includes the species that travel through our coastal flyway on their way to their northern nesting areas and the ones […]

Continue Reading 0
0

The Biggest Moon of All – by Christian Gronau

(All photographs are the author’s unless indicated otherwise.) We all have seen and marvelled: Lewis’ Moon Snail (Neverita lewisii), just as a shell and even more so in the flesh, is a very impressive marine snail indeed. Difficult to imagine, but the large body of this snail can be withdrawn into the shell completely. It […]

Continue Reading 0
0

Beverly Anne Mathews

On the morning of February 4th, Beverly Anne Mathews (nee Horrex) 86, peacefully passed away at her home with children Sheril, Jeannie, and Richard Mathews by her side. Bev grew up in Enderby B.C., daughter of Nora and Charles Horrex.  She attended and completed Normal School in Victoria (1947-48), and took her first teaching job […]

Continue Reading 0
0

Owls Are the Best Field Assistants in Biodiversity Studies – by Christian Gronau

Owls Are the Best Field Assistants in Biodiversity Studies – An Appreciation of Owl Pellets Oliver Pearson, a pioneer in Patagonian mammalogy, always said that owls were his best field assistants during Patagonian surveys. They hunted more species and more individuals than his trap lines, so they were useful estimators of field abundance.                […]

Continue Reading 0
0

June Cameron – by Lynne Jordan

June Cameron (June 10, 1929 – July 24, 2016) With her children around her, June Cameron passed away peacefully July 24, 2016, at age 87, after suffering a severe stroke while sitting on a bench with her son Ian, watching the sun set over quiet and scenic Como Lake above Port Moody. Her last words […]

Continue Reading 0
0

Web Design by Ester Strijbos

X